Coffee, where it comes from and why we love it so

For many of us, coffee is an important part of the day; from our early morning espresso fix before a business meeting, to an ear bending chat over a flat white with a good friend. Whatever your choice of style or flavour, or your reason for drinking it, coffee is the worlds most consumed drink -with over 400 billion cups drunk worldwide.

But where did our fascination for the rich fragranced velvet drink come from?

Coffee, as a drink has been around for some time. Some reports date it as far back as the 10th century. There are many fascinating stories which try to give us a definitive answer of how we came to drink coffee, but the general ideas are the same and so it goes something like this…

After eating the berries of the coffea plant, animal’s behaviours were observed as hyper or joyful. In one tale, goats were described as dancing after eating the berries of the coffea tree. Intrigued at the animals behaviours under the influence of the berries, humans decided to try them for themselves. Disgusted by their raw texture and flavour, the berries were thrown into a fire where they were roasted; thus the rich coffee aroma was born and that fresh roasted coffee scent has had us hooked ever since.

coffee shutterstock_660230209.jpgBut it’s not just the bold chocolaty bouquet that keeps us drinking the world’s most favoured hot beverage. Coffee has become more than just a habit for a pleasant caffeine lift. Instead, drinking coffee has become a religious affair. Getting together to drink coffee is about fostering communities, repairing sorrow and building bridges between despair and hope. How many times have you heard those sacred words ‘do you fancy a coffee?’ and your little cup of joy has overflowed at the prospect of an hour of putting the world to rights, pouring your heart out or formatting an indestructible life plan?

Drinking coffee on a social level does more than give us an artificial buzz. It nurtures our souls, it binds communities and stimulates conversations and these are the things that are important to us. These are the things that make us human. And that is why, apart from being woken up and having our senses stimulated, we enjoy consuming coffee on such a colossal scale.

Whilst getting together with friends, colleagues and families, you are encouraged to be aware of the coffee industry and help support the 3rd world countries that produce it. Most of the world’s coffee is produced between the tropics; the areas where water is most scarce.

UK coffee week (16-22 April 2018) is sponsored by the Allegra foundation which raises funds for areas such as Tanzania and assists them with producing access to water facilities, so that women and children don’t have to walk up to 15 kilometres a day to get their days’ supply of water. To date, Project Waterfall has raised over £230’000 which has benefited over 10’000 people in Tanzania.

You can donate to the charity here at Allegra foundation .

The London Coffee festival takes place 12-15 April 2018

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